Oct
31
Wed
Halloween
Oct 31 all-day

Ancient Origins of Halloween. Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1.

Nov
4
Sun
Daylight Savings (End)
Nov 4 all-day

When local daylight time is about to reach Sunday November 4, 2018, 2:00:00 clocks are turned backward 1 hour to Sunday, November 4, 2018, 1:00:00 local standard time instead.

Sunrise and sunset will be about 1 hour earlier on Nov 4, 2018 than the day before. There will be more light in the morning.

Also called Fall Back and Winter Time.

Nov
5
Mon
Love your Red Hair Day
Nov 5 all-day

”“When I think back about my immediate reaction to that redheads girl, it seems to spring from an appreciation of natural beauty. I mean the heart pleasure you get from looking at speckled leaves or the palimpsested bark of plane trees in Provence. There was something richly appealing to her color combination, the ginger snaps floating in the milk-white skin, the golden highlights in the strawberry hair. it was like autumn, looking at her. It was like driving up north to see the colors.”
― Jeffrey Eugenides

It is the symbol of a fiery personality that is ruled by its passions, a strong-headed person who knows what they want and how to get it. They say the fire inside matches the fire of the hair, and to many red hair is the very definition of what it means to be Irish. Rumors have abounded throughout history to describe and define the redhead, but if you are one, Love Your Red Hair Day is the time to revel in your utter gingerness, and truly love your red hair.

History of Love Your Red Hair Day
Red hair has truly had its share of myths associated with it, but we’ll begin with a few of the most common. Red hair, while common to Ireland, is not native to Ireland. You can generally assure that if you’ve seen an Irish redhead, she’s got some Norwegian blood in her. Red hair, you see, was brought to Ireland by the pillaging and rapacious Vikings. As they moved in, they left the fire in their hearts in the blood of their wives and slaves, and soon, in the sons and daughters that came from their union. It seems only apt that the same fire that graced their manes should come out in the children, and the attitude to match.

Red hair has often not been seen in a positive light, there are jokes made about redheads not having a soul, one that comes directly from an old European myth that the red in their hair is from the stolen fires of hell. It has also been associated with true and drastic beauty, Cleopatra herself was said to be a redhead. Unsurprising that she was also a bit of a fierce woman, a manipulator, and ultimately ruled by her passions. What can we say, redheads seem to be of a type.

Love Your Red Hair day encourages you to remember the myths and histories of redheads, but also to revel in the strength and beauty that is often associated with it. Remember, when the world is at your feet, you’re a blonde, when it’s carrying you on a palanquin, you’re obviously a redhead.

How to celebrate Love Your Red Hair Day
Red hair does have some peculiarities to it, though it comes in as many types and styles as any other color. But to truly take advantage of the incredible, and sometimes persnickety color you are best supported by your hair dresser. Go out and take special care of your red hair on Love Your Red Hair Day, pick up an outfit that truly augments it and let your hairdresser do amazing things with it. Then go gather with other red heads and set the world on fire!

Nov
11
Sun
Veteran’s Day
Nov 11 all-day

Veterans Day is intended to honor and thank all military personnel who served the United States in all wars, particularly living veterans. It is marked by parades and church services and in many places the American flag is hung at half mast. A period of silence lasting two minutes may be held at 11am. Some schools are closed on Veterans Day, while others do not close, but choose to mark the occasion with special assemblies or other activities.

Nov
19
Mon
International Men’s Day
Nov 19 all-day

International Men’s Day was created in 1999 in Trinidad and Tobago. The main purpose of the day is to focus on the health of males. Other aspects of the day include improving gender relations, showing that men can be positive role models, and promoting gender equality.

Over eighty countries celebrate Man Day, but it’s not always been like this. Most countries on the list such as the United States and the United Kingdom have only recently started to promote the day.

If you want to take part in events, look on-line to find one of many groups gathering together to have fun. Most places will have fun events with a “manly” theme, such as wrestling and rodeo bull riding.

Some years, the coordinators of Man Day suggest a secondary theme to be taken into consideration. Although it’s not needed to follow these themes, most countries do as they allow each country to feel as if they’re part of something bigger.

Nov
20
Tue
Universal Children’s Day
Nov 20 all-day

You’ve heard so many people say it: children are the future. And whether you yourself have children or not, that still rings true. Today’s children are tomorrow’s scientists, politicians, doctors and teachers. Today’s children will inherit all of what humanity has managed to accomplish since the beginning of its existence, both the good and honorable deeds and the cruel wars and terrible failures. It is the children of today that will be charged with protecting the weak and vulnerable of this world, and making even the hardest of decisions in order to do so. Who then, if not our children, deserves a holiday? This special day is dedicated to all of the children, so that they may enjoy these carefree years while they last and be ready for the responsibilities that await them. So let’s live it up, kids!

The History of Universal Children’s Day

Universal Children’s Day was first announced by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1954. Originally, there were 2 goals this day was to help achieve: to encourage children of all races, creeds and religions to spend time together, getting to know each other and appreciating each other’s differences, and to prompt governments worldwide to pay more attention to the welfare of their youngest citizens. Although Universal Children’s Day takes place on November 20th, each country that participates in the festivities has its own date set aside for this purpose—in South Sudan, for example, Children’s Day is celebrated on December 23rd, in Cuba on the third Sunday of July, and in Poland on June 1st. Since its establishment as a holiday, Universal Children’s Day has been tied to many different, honorable causes, such as the commitment to stopping HIV/AIDS by 2015. Another one of the goals Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon of the United Nations aspires to reach is for every child to have access to an education and be able to attend school. Promoting peace, respect and concern for the environment among the world’s children are also considered to be of utmost importance.

How to Celebrate Universal Children’s Day

The first thing you’ll have to ask yourself when celebrating Children’s Day is when you want to celebrate it. As mentioned before, nearly every country celebrates this day on a different date, so depending on where you are in the world, the ways you can do it vary. If you have children, this day would be a great day to spend with them, doing something both fun and educational that the whole family can enjoy. How about a trip to the zoo? Nothing is quite as fascinating to children as wild animals are, and watching them live and function will give you lots of opportunities to talk about different parts of the world and the environment with yours. You could also take them to see a good children’s movie, so you can first watch it and then discuss the story afterwards. Why did the hero/heroin behave the way he or she did? Why was the villain’s behavior wrong? What would your child do if he or she was in a similar situation? Though many people do not seem to notice, all of the better animated movies are not just about colorful animation and lively songs—they teach important life lessons to children as well, about friendship, loyalty, compassion, common sense and love, making them excellent topics for a conversation with your son or daughter over an ice cream sundae after the movie.

Nov
22
Thu
No School • Thanksgiving Day
Nov 22 all-day

Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated in Canada, the United States, some of the Caribbean islands, and Liberia. It began as a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. Similarly named festival holidays occur in Germany and Japan. Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States, and around the same part of the year in other places. Although Thanksgiving has historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, it has long been celebrated as a secular holiday as well.

Dec
1
Sat
World AIDS Day
Dec 1 all-day

There is a disease that reached out into the world and changed the way we thought about everything, from how we got our blood transfusions to our sexual practices. It was met with a campaign of fear and superstition that harmed both those who had it, and the families and friends of those who surrounded them. While HIV and AIDS are out in the world today, the horror stories that were told of how it works and how it was transmitted have largely been mitigated. World AIDS Day works to ensure that those who suffer from AIDS can live in a safer, more understanding world and help further research to eliminate it.

History of World AIDS Day
World AIDS Day was first held in 1988, just four years after the discovery of the virus and its official classification. Since that time 35 million people have died, putting it far ahead of many of the other most devastating diseases in the history of man. Since that day the work of men and women everywhere has led to a greater understanding of HIV/AIDS (you can’t get it by sharing a can of coke, or sharing a toilet seat, for instance), but that has only served to slow the tide. 6,000 people each year are diagnosed with HIV in the UK alone, and there are still people out there who don’t know all the facts about it.

How to celebrate World AIDS Day
Start off by educating yourself about AIDS on websites like Worldaidsday.org, and then start researching what you can do to help. Whether it’s a small donation to help fund education and research, or volunteering your time to help with their campaigns and causes, there’s little you can do that’s as worthwhile as helping to end the epidemic that is HIV/AIDS.

You can also wear a red ribbon on World AIDS Day to help spread awareness of the disease, and hand out red ribbons to your friends, co-workers, and family to help them spread the word as well. It’s important that everyone understand the dangers of HIV/AIDS, and just as important that they understand how it’s contracted. Not just as a way to avoid contracting it, but to reduce the fear that surrounds this horrible condition.

Dec
7
Fri
Pear Harbor Remembrance Day
Dec 7 all-day

“Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.”
– President Franklin D. Roosevelt

There is a beautiful lagoon in the Hawaiian Islands that is named for the lustrous jewel that is formed when a piece of sand irritates a clam into coating it to protect itself. This harbor also houses the headquarters of the United States Pacific Fleet, and has been an important part of the American Naval placement in the Pacific Ocean since 1887. Little did anyone know at that time that an attack on this harbor would bring the entire might of the American Military into a war it was desperately seeking to avoid. Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day honors the men and women who died in the Japanese attack on this beautiful harbor one December day in 1941.

History of Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
The History of Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day is the history of the attack itself, an attack which took place on December 7th, 1941. The attack was devastating, killing over 2,400 citizens of the United States from the time it began at 7:48am Hawaiian time and ended just 90 minutes later, making the attack incredibly devastating. Multiple ships were lost during the attack, though things could have been much worse.

Intelligence gathered after the attack indicated that there was intended to be a third-wave of attacks to hit the island, complete with an invasion fleet intended to take the island and prevent it from being used as an American base of operation. The purpose behind this surprise attack? America was well positioned in the Pacific to interfere with Japanese fleet maneuvering, and it was hoped that by launching this assault they would cripple the US Pacific Presence and be able to control the ocean unhindered.

How to celebrate Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
Celebrating Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day is your opportunity to show your support for those veterans who are still alive from the Pearl Harbor bombing, and pay your respect to those who give themselves in service to our country and its security every day. All over the US there are ceremonies to honor these men and women along with the rest of the surviving WWII veteran’s, of which there were 855,070 in 2016. Servicemen all over the world deserve the respect of their countrymen, and the war affected us all, so even if you aren’t American, pay your respects to those who serve.

Dec
10
Mon
Human Rights Day
Dec 10 all-day

Every so often a thing comes to pass that is of such astounding importance that we must stand up and recognize it. We must place this thing on the pedestal it deserves, and ensure that the precepts and policies put in place by it are adhered to, appreciated, and spread as far as the human voice will carry. Such is the sort of message sent by Human Rights Day.

History of Human Rights Day
Human Rights Day was established in 1948, and ever since that auspicious day it has stood as the first major stride forward in ensuring that the rights of every human across the globe are protected. From the most basic human needs such as food, shelter, and water, all the way up to access to free and uncensored information, such has been the goals and ambitions laid out that day.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was a shout across the world by the leading countries in the world, stating loud and clear that no matter where we live, what we believe, or how we love, we are each individually deserving of the most basic fundaments of human needs. Every year Human Rights Day marks conferences around the world dedicated to ensuring that these ideals are pursued, and that the basic Human Rights of every person is made a priority in the global theater.

How to Celebrate Human Rights Day
The first and foremost way to celebrate Human Rights Day is to take some time to appreciate the effect that this resolution has had on your world and life. Look around your neighborhood and see the effects on a local scale, the charitable works being done to promote the health and well-being of those who are less fortunate.

The next step is to get out there and make a difference, whether it’s simply making a donation to one of the dozens of organizations that work towards this global purpose, or organizing a donation drive of your own to help out those organizations fighting the good fight.

Don’t think that your gestures have to be grand, simply gathering enough to put together a bunch of care packages of simple needs and necessities and handing them out amongst your local homeless can go a long way to helping to support this cause. The need is large, but is made of limitless minor actions that can lead to a world-wide change in quality of life.