Feb
19
Mon
No School • President’s Day
Feb 19 all-day

Washington’s Birthday, also known as Presidents’ Day, is a federal holiday held on the third Monday of February. The day honors presidents of the United States, including George Washington, the USA’s first president.
Washington’s Birthday officially honors the life and work of George Washington, the first president of the United States. The day commemorates past presidents of the USA. Washington’s Birthday is sometimes known as Presidents’ Day. This is because while most states have adopted Washington’s Birthday, some states officially celebrate Presidents’ Day.

Some states pay particular attention to Abraham Lincoln, as his birthday was also in mid-February. In the weeks or days leading up to the holiday, schools often organize events and lessons for students about the presidents of the United States and George Washington in particular. It is a popular day for stores to start their sales.

The US federal holiday is on the third Monday of February each year, but records show that George Washington’s birthday is on February 22.

Feb
20
Tue
Alfaparf Stem Cell Class @ ASM Beauty World Academy
Feb 20 @ 8:30 am – 9:30 am
Alfaparf Stem Cell Class @ ASM Beauty World Academy

Alfaparf Stem cell class for Students, Graduates and Cosmetologists for free at ASM

Feb
23
Fri
Alfaparf Stem Cells Class @ ASM Beauty World Academy
Feb 23 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Mar
2
Fri
Employee Apreciation Day
Mar 2 all-day

History of Employee Appreciation Day
Employee Appreciation Day began, perhaps, as a response to Boss’s Day, where the employees were reminded of the importance of respecting and appreciating all that their bosses have done for them. In turn, it became necessary to encourage recognition of both sides of this very important equation. It is often too easy to forget that your employees are some of the most important assets your company can possess. We underestimate all the things they do for us, not just within the scope of their jobs, but above and beyond the scope of their jobs in keeping our business running smoothly.

It doesn’t matter whether your employees are part of a manufacturing facility, or merely work the phone all day handling billing and customer complaints, your business could not operate without them. There’s an old saying “An office can operate without a boss for a day, but not without a receptionist”, and that certainly stands as a clear reminder of all that our employees do, and just how important they can be to our businesses.

How to Celebrate Employee Appreciation Day
Celebrating Employee Appreciation Day is simple, and it’s right there in the name. Take the time to get to know your employees, maybe schedule a day where rather than coming in and spending the day hard at work, your employees (or part of them, you don’t have to appreciate them just on the holiday!) can sit down and get to know their management.

It could just be a card on their desk or a display of appreciation in the form of an email sent out through the company system. Whatever you do, make sure you remind these vital parts of your business just how important they are to you and the company. It’s sure to improve morale, and that improves performance as well!

Mar
8
Thu
International Women’s Day
Mar 8 all-day

The History of Women’s Day

It may come as a rather sad surprise that Women’s Day was first celebrated on February 28th, 1909 in New York. Two years later, German socialist Luise Zietz proposed that the holiday become an annually observed one that would celebrate various women’s issues, such as suffrage, so as to promote equal rights for women. The first few Women’s Days were celebrated in a quite different fashion than they are nowadays, with hundreds of demonstrations taking place in Europe. During these demonstrations, women demanded they finally be given both the right to vote and to hold public office. Employment sex discrimination was also an important issue. In 1917, the Women’s Day demonstrations in Saint Petersburg, Russia, helped initiate the February Revolution, when women marched through the city demanding an end to World War I. This shocked even Leon Trotsky, who, much like other Russian leaders of the day, did not expect the Women’s Day protests to cause that much of a stir. Until 1977, Women’s Day was celebrated mainly in socialist countries. It was only after the United Nations General Assembly’s decision to proclaim March 8th International Women’s Day that the holiday gained worldwide popularity.

How to Celebrate Women’s Day

There are many ways that you can go about celebrating this holiday, but all of them have a similar goal: to raise awareness about the struggles of women the world over and honor their achievements. Of course, not all achievements are huge, worldwide game-changers like women finally obtaining the right to vote—there are all sorts of other, smaller feats that women you know manage on an everyday basis that you may not pay too much attention to until you try calming 2 crying toddlers, making dinner and explaining the particulars of a newly-acquired client to your boss over the phone at the same time. This may sound ridiculously hard to pull off, but this is something thousands of women pull off every day, something that should be deeply appreciated and something that nobody should take for granted. Grand gestures aren’t necessarily required to show appreciation, either—sometimes a simple “thank you, I have no idea how you do it” is enough to lift an overworked woman’s spirits. If you’d like to do something more, though, there is a virtually endless amount of things you can do to help improve women’s lives the world. You can attend one of the 1000+ events organized globally where you can learn about what women’s lives are like in different countries and make a donation to the event you attend. Reading books is also a great way of broadening your horizons, and biographies of women like fearless Somalian women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali will definitely open your eyes and inspire you to see women’s lives and problems completely differently.

Mar
11
Sun
Daylight Saving (Start)
Mar 11 @ 3:00 am – 3:00 am

When local standard time is about to reach
Sunday, March 11, 2018, 2:00:00 clocks are turned forward 1 hour to
Sunday, March 11, 2018, 3:00:00 local daylight time instead.

Sunrise and sunset will be about 1 hour later on March 11, 2018 than the day before. There will be more light in the evening.

Also called Spring Forward, Summer Time, and Daylight Savings Time.

Mar
17
Sat
St. Patricks Day
Mar 17 all-day

Saint Patrick’s Day, colloquially St. Paddy’s Day or simply Paddy’s Day, is an annual feast day which celebrates Saint Patrick, the most commonly recognised of the patron saints of Ireland.

Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated worldwide by those of Irish descent and increasingly by people of other ethnicities as well, notably in Argentina, Australia, New Zealand and North America. Celebrations are generally themed around all things Irish and, by association, the colour green. Both Christians and non-Christians celebrate the secular version of the holiday by wearing green, eating Irish food and/or green foods, imbibing Irish drink and attending parades, which have a particularly long history in the United States and in Canada.

Mar
30
Fri
No School • Good Friday
Mar 30 all-day

Good Friday occurs two days before Easter Sunday in the United States. It is the day when Christians commemorate Jesus Christ’s crucifixion, which plays an important part in the Christian faith.

Apr
1
Sun
April’s Fool Day
Apr 1 all-day

April Fools’ Day, also known as All Fools’ Day, is observed every year on the first day of April by playing harmless pranks on unsuspecting recipients and spreading hoaxes. The pranks as well as the victims themselves are called April fools. Shouting “April Fool” at the victim of the joke usually serves as the resolution of the prank. Many newspapers, radio and TV stations and other media outlets take part in the tradition by publishing practical jokes, mostly spectacular stories, narratives or information. They contain subtle clues that the story is a hoax and are usually resolved the next day. It is a generally accepted custom that the pranks should not be harmful and have to cease by noon. The tradition of All Fools’ Day exists in North America as well as in most European countries. April Fools’ Day is not a public holiday in any country where it is practiced and there are no vacations from work or school.

In one of the most famous April Fools’ Day jokes, broadcast on the BBC current affairs program Panorama on April 1, 1957, farmers were shown picking spaghetti from “spaghetti trees” during the spaghetti harvest in Switzerland. The BBC subsequently received a number of inquiries about the program from people requesting further information about spaghetti cultivation and how to grow spaghetti trees.

Easter
Apr 1 all-day

Jesus Christ’s resurrection is celebrated on Easter Sunday. The Easter date depends on the ecclesiastical approximation of the March equinox.